Half-time: Leeds United 0 QPR 0

first_imgQPR competed well in the first half but lost Jamie Mackie after he picked up what appeared to be another hamstring injury.Rangers forward Mackie, who missed more than three months of the season with a hamstring problem, went off after 24 minutes at Elland Road.He was replaced by Sebastian Polter, who picked up a knock during Friday’s defeat against Middlesbrough and was left out of the starting line-up in favour of Conor Washington.Junior Hoilett and Massimo Luongo were also recalled to the side, with Tjaronn Chery and Karl Henry dropping to the bench.Rangers failed to trouble 19-year-old goalkeeper Bailey Peacock-Farrell, who is making his senior debut for Leeds, before the youngster kept out a shot from Hoilett on 38 minutes.Earlier, Hoilett sent an effort over and Matt Phillips fired wide of the near post as both teams struggled to create clear-cut chances.And in the final seconds of the half, Polter and Washington were just unable to connect with Phillips’ cross.At the other end, in-form Rangers keeper Alex Smithies comfortably gathered efforts from Mustapha Carayol and former Brentford man Stuart Dallas.QPR: Smithies; Onuoha, Angella, Hall, Perch; Phillips, Faurlin, Luongo, Hoilett; Mackie (Polter 25), Washington.Subs: Ingram, Robinson, Henry, Chery, Gladwin, El Khayati.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

NBA Finals: Inside the Kevin Durant-Jeff Green friendship

first_imgWant Warriors news in your inbox? Sign up for the free DubsDaily newsletter.CLEVELAND – The news left Kevin Durant feeling surprised, worried and depressed.His childhood friend and former NBA teammate, Jeff Green, took a routine basketball physical in Dec. 2011 and soon learned he might die soon after being diagnosed with an aortic aneurysm. Just over a month later, Green had open-heart surgery to save his life.It would not take too long for Green to leave Durant feeling inspired once …last_img read more

South African sisters ride for rhinos

first_img10 July 2015Two sisters from Cape Town, Vanessa and Victoria Wiesenmaier, are cycling 6 000km from China to Singapore to save rhinos. They set off in April, and yesterday were speeding along the Mekong.They have called their campaign Buy No Rhino, taken from the Wildaid slogan: “When the buying stops, the killing can too.”“We will be travelling through Vietnam, China and Thailand, the main consumer markets driving the demand for rhino horn,” say the sisters. “Especially in these countries we want to reach the people! Even if we cannot change a whole culture, we will sow a seed of change.”Only with demand reduction will the rhino have a chance of survival, say Vanessa (30) and Victoria (35).Extinction threatThe two African rhino species, the black rhino and the white rhino, are threatened by poaching. If the development of the past years continues it is expected that the rhino will become extinct in the near future. The war against rhino poaching will be won in Asia, not in Africa, they say of their decision to take the fight to the market.The poaching of rhinos has reached a crisis point, they say. Designed to raise awareness of the plight of the rhino, the Buy No Rhino Bike Tour, is taking the sisters through China, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia and, finally, Singapore. Along the way, they are urging consumers to stop buying rhino horn.Vietnam, China and Thailand are the main consumer markets for rhino horn. For their campaign, the Wiesenmaiers are working with Project Rhino KZN, partners of the Kingsley Holgate Foundation, to educate youth in hopes of curbing the demand for rhino horn.In Vietnam, the sisters teamed-up with Operation Game Change, a joint alliance between the governments of the United States and Vietnam aimed at ending wildlife crime, especially rhino horn.Save our rhinosThey give presentations at various stages along the way, promoting discussion on rhino poaching, rhino horn trafficking and how to stop the global urgent issue. They are also rolling out a Rhino Art project at schools and collecting signatures for the World Youth Wildlife Declaration, which will be presented to the Cites 2016 summit in Cape Town.According to the South African Department of Environmental Affairs, the number of rhinos poached in South Africa is spiking, with 1 215 poached in 2014 – up from 1 004 in 2013 and 668 in 2012. Operation Game Change says this is a rise from just 122 rhinos poached five years earlier.The Wiesenmaiers said the poaching of rhinoceroses was gruesome, Voice of America reported. Poachers tranquilised the animal and then cut off the horn. When the rhino woke up it slowly bled to death.In Asia, consumers buy horn products they believe cure everything from cancer to hangovers. At tens of thousands of dollars per kilogram, the horns are a luxury item sometimes given to bosses and officials. “To know that these animals are killed for pure greed and money, for some funny belief that the horn is a status symbol, that’s a tragedy,’ said Victoria.Personal issueSpeaking from the Laos-Vietnam border, she told Voice of America the issue was personal. A friend in South Africa had four of the six rhinos on his reservation slaughtered; he decided to leave the carcasses out so that people could see the results of poaching.“We saw live rhinos before that, so to see this crumbled, dead thing, it was really shocking, it was disgusting.”Vietnam is the biggest consumer of rhino horns in the world, and on their journey, Vanessa and Victoria are targeting schools, where they give a presentation about the harms of the horn trade, hold a discussion and then have students create artwork on the topic.It is hoped the children will be more open-minded and pass on the message to their parents. Vietnamese businessmen, celebrities, and state officials are “the strongest driver of the current rhino poaching crisis”, according to a 2013 report by wildlife group Traffic.South Africa and Vietnam are the key countries involved in the supply and demand sides of the rhino trade, respectively.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Our History of Petroleum Use

first_imgWhile most of us think of the petroleum age starting in the late 1850s, when North America’s first oil well began gushing oil, human use of petroleum actually goes back much further.Asphalt, a heavy constituent of petroleum (see last week’s blog), was used four thousand years ago in constructing the walls of Babylon. During the Roman era, oil was collected and used in the province of Dacia (now Romania), where it was referred to as “picula.” Fossil fuels were first used for lighting, not vehiclesThrough the 1800s, most oil was used for oil lamps and kerosene lamps — replacing whale oil, which was becoming scarce by then. By the early years of the 20th century, though, development of the internal combustion engine shifted demand of petroleum products to automobiles — the market that has driven demand ever since.With the rise of the automobile in the early 1900s and its use of gasoline — a mix of hydrocarbon refined from crude oil — production of petroleum increased dramatically. World oil production today totals 31 billion barrels per year — almost exactly 1,000 barrels per second!In the U.S., approximately 72% of our petroleum is used for transportation (gasoline, diesel fuel, and aviation fuel), with the rest used for heating oil, industrial processes, petrochemical feedstocks, lubricants, asphalt, electricity generation, and other uses.Next week I’ll take a look at current reserves of petroleum as well as the outlook for this fossil fuel in the years and decades ahead.In addition to this Energy Solutions blog, Alex contributes to the weekly blog BuildingGreen’s Product of the Week, which profiles an interesting new green building product each week. You can sign up to receive notices of these blogs by e-mail — enter your e-mail address in the upper right corner of any blog page.Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. Fourth-century oil wells in ChinaThe first oil wells are believed to have been drilled in China around 350 AD; these wells were drilled using bits attached to bamboo poles and extending as deep as 800 feet. That oil was burned to evaporate brine to produce salt. By the 10th Century the Chinese even built bamboo pipelines to transport oil from those wells to salt springs where the brine was collected.In Japan, petroleum was used for lighting at least as far back as the 7th century. Baghdad’s first streets were paved with asphalt. Marco Polo described oil fields in what is now Azerbaijan, where naphtha was produced. And in the 9th century, petroleum was distilled by the Persian alchemist Muhammad ibn Zakariya Razi into kerosene that was used in lamps.The first North American reference to petroleum was in 1595 when Sir Walter Raleigh wrote about Pitch Lake on the Caribbean island of Trinidad. With a surface area of about 100 acres and a depth as great as 250 feet, this is the world’s largest natural deposit of asphalt; it is a significant tourist attraction, and asphalt from this deposit has long been exported — some was used in early paving of some New York City streets.center_img Poland drilled for oil before the U.S.The modern oil industry began in the 1850s. In 1853, the world’s first commercial oil well was drilled in Poland and the second was drilled in Romania in 1857. An oil well in Oil Springs, Ontario in 1858 was the first in North America, and that was followed in 1859 with the famous oil well in Titusville, Pennsylvania, when Edwin Drake drilled a 69-foot well that yielded 25 barrels per day.Petroleum production in the U.S. increased steadily during the first 50 years of production: 2,000 barrels in 1859, 4.2 million barrels in 1868, 20 million barrels in 1879, 35 million barrels in 1889, 57 million barrels in 1899, and 126 million barrels in 1906.last_img read more

‘Provide a solution for unemployment’

first_imgSwaraj India president Yogendra Yadav on Saturday said that in the run up to the Assembly polls in Haryana, there should be a meaningful debate on the issue of unemployment in the State. “The BJP government must answer the public on the question of unemployment and other political parties must come up with alternative solutions,” said Mr. Yadav.He said that Swaraj India will come up with a concrete alternative roadmap for full employment within next few days.last_img