Red or Dead leaves W8

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Teesland plans giant Glasgow office tower

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Governor Wolf, Senate Leaders Announce Slate of Judicial Nominations

first_img June 13, 2016 Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf, Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman and Senate Democratic Leader Jay Costa announced a slate of nominations for judicial vacancies. These nominations require confirmation by the Senate.“I thank Republican and Democratic leaders in the Senate for working with me in a collaborative way to ensure these vacancies on our courts are filled,” Governor Wolf said.The nominees are:Supreme Court – Judge Sallie MundySuperior Court – Carl Solano, Judge Lillian Harris Ransom and Geoffrey MoultonCommonwealth Court – Joe Cosgrove and Julia HearthwayAllegheny County Court of Common Pleas – David SpurgeonBerks County Court of Common Pleas – Jill Gehman KoestelBucks County Court of Common Pleas – Jeffrey G. TraugerDauphin County Court of Common Pleas – Lori SerratelliLackawanna County Court of Common Pleas – Julia MunleyLehigh County Court of Common Pleas – Daniel McCarthyMontgomery County Court of Common Pleas – Joseph WalshCity of Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas: Stella Tsai, Vincent Furlong, Daniel Sulman, Lucretia Clemons, Roger Gordon and Vincent MelchiorreWashington County Court of Common Pleas: Damon FaldowskiYork County Court of Common Pleas – Kathleen Prendergast and Christy FawcettAllegheny County Magisterial District Court – Dan ButlerCentre County Magisterial District Court – Robert BascomChester County Magisterial District Court – Elizabeth Curtis SwainCumberland County Magisterial District Court – Jonathan BirbeckDauphin County Magisterial District Court – David O’LearyLackawanna County Magisterial District Court – Bruce ZeroNorthampton County Magisterial District Court – Alicia ZitoWestmoreland County Magisterial District Court – Wayne Gongaware SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf, Senate Leaders Announce Slate of Judicial Nominationslast_img read more

This property has not one, but two, swimming pools

first_img1664 Riverdale Drive, Hope Island is on the market, set to go to auction on February 24.It’s an entertainer’s dream — a media room, wide riverfront views and not one, but two, swimming pools.From the stunning entry pavilion of flagstone tiles meandering through palm trees, pebbles and water gardens, finished by the crisp white and timber facade, the residence opens up into a spacious and opulent interior. The Hope Island home is located in an exclusive estate.The master suite has a fully fitted out walk-in robe, large full ensuite bathroom and spectacular waterfront views while the other four bedroom suites offer similar features.The four-bedroom, five-bathroom property is located in an exclusive gated estate and offers bridge-free access to the Broadwater. The stunning entry pavilion. It offers water views and bridge-free access to the Broadwater.CoreLogic property data shows the median house price in Hope Island has surged, increasing by 43.4 per cent over the past five years. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa20 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoThe pool in a private courtyard at the side of the property.One pool is tucked away in a private sun-drenched courtyard at the side of the property, with space for a dining setting, while the other overlooks the 23.8m of water frontage and large pontoon, flanked by a timber deck and manicured gardens.Double height ceilings, large porcelain tiles and wall-length glass feature throughout to allow light to flow through.last_img read more

Brisbane Queenslander undergoes incredible transformation

first_imgThe home at 84 Watson St, Camp Hill today. Picture: supplied.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:36Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:36 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhat do QLD buyers want?00:36The owners of this 1909 Queenslander waited a decade to get their hands on the property known as Croyde.Karen Hartley said she and her husband first spotted the home at 84 Watson St, Camp Hill while walking with their two young children in 2005.“We said wouldn’t it be a great place for entertaining friends and family for the kids to grow up in,” she said.The property was placed on the market and over the ensuing 10 years the couple placed several offers on the home until one was finally accepted in 2015.“When we bought it, it was a single storey house on stilts,” Mrs Hartley said.“It was in OK condition for its age but was in need of a lot of love and care.“There was only one bathroom in the house, a small kitchen, two proper bedrooms and the dining room had been converted into another bedroom.”The original home at 84 Watson St, Camp Hill, in the 1940s. Picture: supplied.The original house was built by watchmaker and jeweller Ebenezer Jones in 1909 on an 1882sq m plot of land he purchased in 1908.He mortgaged the land for 320 pounds and built a house with VJ walls and ceilings, pressed metal cornices, brick chimney, chandeliers and hoop pine floorboards, all of which remain today. Mr Jones’ glass storefront plaque also remains with the house.The home passed through two more families before landing with the Hartleys, who undertook significant restoration work and renovations, working with the Brisbane City Architecture and Heritage Team and award-winning builder Corella Construction.The home at 84 Watson St, Camp Hill, in 2014.The heritage listed house was raised, built-in underneath and completely restored.“The amount of time, energy and passion that went into this renovation, not only from our family but also our builders and trades, is evident in the finished product,” Mrs Hartley said.“It is a true home, it’s not just a house.”Today in the original upstairs space there is a front veranda, formal lounge and dining rooms and a galley-style kitchen opening to a rear deck, along with a bathroom, sitting room, master suite with dressing room and ensuite, and second bedroom.A standout feature is the functional two-storey, double sided chimney with fireplace in the formal living room, a hearth for the cooker in the original kitchen and brick support column on the lower level.The formal living room in 2014. Picture: supplied.The timber floorboards are exposed in the living room today. Picture: supplied.Mrs Hartley said lower level of the chimney once had a fire pit with a copper pot sitting above for boiling laundry.“We still have that copper pot — it’s been full restored,” she said.And that is just the start of the restoration work done over a period of seven months, which followed eight months of planning.“Upstairs the pressed metal cornices were restored, all the decking needed to be replaced and the original glass and crystal chandeliers all had to be restored,” Mrs Hartley said.“A lot of paint had to come off, layers and layers of it.“The breeze windows had all been painted closed so a lot of work went into them. My husband restored the original mechanisms that open and close the windows.“The old gas light fittings have also been restored and they are still on the walls.”The 1960s-era kitchen and bathroom were replaced with more traditional spaces but the original claw foot bathtub still takes pride of place in the bathroom.The kitchen in 2014 only had one small window. Picture: supplied.The kitchen now has bi-fold doors opening to a deck. Picture: supplied.“The kitchen is the hub of the home,” Mrs Hartley said.“It’s a beautiful space opening to the deck. It has a 3m long Caesarstone bench with seating all the way around that takes in the city from the lights of the Gabba to the second arch of the Story Bridge.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours ago“It’s the place we find ourselves most often.”Mrs Hartley said early on in the restoration process they discovered a storage area with terrazzo flooring on the back veranda was once a bathroom, so they got permission to convert the space into an ensuite for the master bedroom.The new area downstairs houses a wine cellar, second kitchen, games lounge, bathroom, laundry and three covered patios. There are also three more bedrooms, with ensuites, walk-in wardrobes and study nooks to two.The bathroom in 2014. Picture: suppliedThe bathroom today. Picture: supplied.“Downstairs is clearly a new addition but it is in keeping with the grandeur of the house,” Mrs Hartley said.The property also has a saltwater swimming pool with pavilion, manicured gardens, fire pit and a six-car garage.“We created all the landscaping. When we bought the house (the yard) was an overgrown mess of shrubs and vines,” Mrs Hartley said.But after restoring the heritage Queenslander and creating a beautiful family home, Mrs Hartley and her husband have decided to sell the now 2025sq m property.“We thought it was going to be our forever home but we’ve found another one,” she said.The property is being marketed by Joanna Gianniotis of Place Bulimba will be auctioned on Thursday, November 7.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:42Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:42 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenTop 5 hot Brisbane suburbs 01:43Renovation FactsBudget: $1.5 millionTime: 15 monthsThe home comes with a pool, a pavilion and a six-car garage, all on a 2025sq m block. Picture: supplied.last_img read more

3 drug suspects fall in buy-bust

first_imgBACOLOD City – Police arrested three drugsuspects in a buy-bust operation in Barangay 4, Kabankalan City, NegrosOccidental. Eight sachets of suspected shabu valued ataround P35,000 were seized from 41-year-old Marvin Diancin, 26-year-old RomrexTorrecampo and 28-year-old Adolfo Bico, a police report showed. Aside from suspected shabu, four cellphonesand drug paraphernalia were also recovered from them, police said. Diancin, Torrecampo and Bico were apprehendedfollowing an entrapment operation around 2:10 a.m. on Tuesday, the reportadded.   The suspects were detained in the lockup cellof the Kabankalan City police station, facing charges for violation of RepublicAct 9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PNlast_img read more

Unerring Madigan sinks Bath

first_img French referee Jerome Garces expertly played advantage, though, and Ford conjured a try out of nothing, leaving Leinster’s defence leaden-footed as he sliced through an inviting gap. His conversion attempt hit the post, yet Leinster responded rapidly as Madigan booted a second penalty before Bath had Watson sin-binned when he took out opposite number Kearney in mid-air, leaving Garces with little option but to brandish a yellow card. Bath had to tighten up their discipline and Madigan did not require a second invitation to keep punishing them as he completed his penalty hat-trick. Bath, though, did not learn their lesson, and two more Madigan penalties opened up a 15-5 interval advantage that meant the visitors had a mountain to climb. Leinster suffered an injury blow within a minute of the second period getting under way as wing Fergus McFadden was helped from the pitch after his head made contact with Eastmond’s shoulder. South African Zane Kirchner replaced him. Bath’s best attacking moments were provided by Ford, and he came up trumps again after 48 minutes as another break took him close to Leinster’s line before he found Hooper in support to claim a well-worked try. Ford’s successful conversion brought Bath back to just three points adrift, but Madigan’s sixth successful penalty gave Leinster a hint of breathing space. Watson then launched another thrilling break from deep inside his own 22, only for wing Horacio Agulla to drop Ford’s pass when the Leinster defence was stretched to breaking point. Bath refused to go quietly, but in Leinster they faced a team that were masters of closing out tight European games – as their record in the competition showed – and the home side looked to reassert some control. A Ford penalty six minutes from time gave Bath renewed hope, yet Leinster held out and left their opponents reflecting on what might have been. Leinster centre Madigan’s six successful penalties condemned Bath to an 18-15 defeat, although the visitors claimed touchdowns by England fly-half George Ford and captain Stuart Hooper. Ford, back at the Aviva Stadium just five weeks after being part of an England team beaten during Ireland’s march to the RBS 6 Nations title, scored a brilliant solo try and also made a break that ended with Hooper breaching Leinster’s defence. Press Association But Bath gave Madigan too many chances to punish them and he delivered a 100 per cent success-rate to book Leinster a semi-final appointment with either Toulon or Wasps, who meet on the Mediterranean coast on Sunday. Bath pushed Leinster to the limit – Ford also converted his own try and kicked a late penalty – yet they were ultimately edged out on an afternoon when Madigan’s accuracy made the difference. The visitors threw everything at their hosts as the clock ticked down, but it was not to be, with Leinster doing just enough to remain in pursuit of silverware. Bath, bidding to reach a first top-flight European semi-final for nine years, were buoyed by returning England quartet Ford, Anthony Watson, Jonathan Joseph and Dave Attwood, with fit-again Wales prop Paul James also starting, but rugby league recruit Sam Burgess was on the bench. Leinster welcomed back all of their Ireland Six Nations stars, including Jamie Heaslip, Sean O’Brien and Rob Kearney, as they looked to take another step towards a possible fourth European crown in the last seven seasons. The opening exchanges proved fast and furious but with little pattern as Leinster relied on fly-half Jimmy Gopperth’s boot, while Bath provided early counter-attacking threats via Watson and centre Kyle Eastmond. Heaslip then went close to touching down near the Bath posts, but, despite the visitors denying him, they conceded a penalty and Madigan kicked Leinster 3-0 ahead. But Bath were not to be denied and they stormed back up field through their South African flanker Francois Louw, whose powerful break meant that Leinster resorted to illegal means in an attempt to stop him. Ian Madigan booted Bath out of Europe as they made an agonising Champions Cup quarter-final exit in Dublin, despite scoring both tries of an absorbing Aviva Stadium encounter.last_img read more

FIRST RUN: Syracuse survives shootout in inaugural Big East victory over Georgetown

first_imgNot only did Amidon put the momentum-changer in to start the fourth, but with Georgetown threatening in the second quarter, it was Amidon who put to rest any idea of a Hoya comeback. All of a sudden, a potent attack went scoreless in the third quarter and Georgetown cut the lead to two. That’s when Jeremy Thompson entered the faceoff X to start the fourth quarter, crouched down, flicked the ball in front of him and the Orange gained control. Thompson raced up the right side of the field and flung it across to Josh Amidon who whipped the ball into the net. Just ten seconds into the fourth quarter the Orange were on the board. The lead was at three, and it finally had some breathing room again. ‘That goal to start the fourth quarter really took a little bit of wind out of our sails,’ Georgetown head coach Dave Urick said. ‘I thought we had a chance to crawl back in that thing, we were only down two goals, but that was a huge goal.’ Comments After Syracuse jumped out to a four-goal halftime lead, momentum shifted and the Orange offense went silent. restern@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+ Amidon’s third goal of the day was part of a four goal fourth quarter that solidified the 15-12 win for No. 2 Syracuse over No. 11 Georgetown at the Carrier Dome in SU’s first-ever Big East conference matchup. In front of a season-high crowd of 6,108, the Orange got on the board early and put some key goals in the back of the net late to hold off a feisty Hoya squad. ‘I tried not to think about the first three games too much and just let my game flow,’ Amidon said. Another Hoya run and another Amidon goal. Though the Hoyas threatened at times, junior Jovan Miller knew his team had control.center_img Published on March 12, 2010 at 12:00 pm The Orange were led by five goals from junior attack Stephen Keogh and four goals from Amidon. This is a trend SU head coach John Desko is more than aware of. Syracuse’s offense came out aggressive and put six goals up in the first quarter. They fired 24 first half shots on goal. But in the second half, when offense was scarce and the Orange only got off 11 shots, it was Amidon and Thompson who were there to score timely goals. But on a day when Syracuse had Amidon to score big goal after big goal and four players register multiple goals, it was Jeremy Thompson’s only score of the afternoon that proved fatal for the Hoyas. Georgetown cut the lead to 12-11 and was the closest they had been all day. But Thompson stepped to the X and this time, didn’t need Amidon or any Orange scorer. He won the faceoff and sprinted upfield on the right side. He unloaded and for the fourth game in a row scored a goal off of a faceoff. The Orange took the 13-11 lead with 7:30 to play in the fourth. Keogh set the tone in the first half, single-handedly outscoring the Hoyas 4-3 in the first quarter, But it was Amidon who struck when it mattered most. He scored two goals in the fourth quarter after the SU offense managed as many shots in the entire third quarter. After a slow start to the season this was a game Amidon was happy to have. ‘When it was a one goal game and looked like it was shifting their way, as juniors we all know it is our time to step up,’ Miller said. ‘Sure your eyebrows raise a little when it is a one goal game, but we just kept our composure.’ ‘He has answered for us a number of times this year when the other team has the momentum and all of a sudden Jeremy puts one out in front and gets a score off of it,’ Desko said. ‘In the faceoff situation we got the momentum to swing back our way.’ After two Hoya goals cut the Syracuse lead to 9-7 with two minutes to play in the half, it was another transition opportunity that Amidon cashed in. Gavin Jenkinson flicked the ball in the air off the faceoff. Amidon gobbled it up and passed it up to Joel White. White ran the break down the middle of the field and dished it off to Amidon on the right wing where he unloaded a low shot right by Hoya goalie Jack Davis.last_img read more

Syracuse downed by No. 3 BYU in three sets

first_imgSyracuse (2-1) started off its time at the Marquette Tournament against No. 3 Brigham Young University (BYU) and the Cougar team (7-0) lived up to its billing, winning the game 3-0 in Milwaukee, WI. BYU was coming off a weekend where they beat then-No. 1 Stanford 3-2. Despite not winning a single set, Syracuse played competitively. The Orange never trailed by more than six throughout all three sets. In the first set, despite going down by six, SU went on an 8-1 run to take a 19-18 lead. BYU ultimately came back, however, winning the set 25-23.Syracuse jumped out to a 9-7 lead in the second set and it went back and forth until the set was tied 15-15. That’s when BYU went on a quick 4-0 run and soon put the set away 25-20. The third set was almost all BYU. Syracuse never took hold of the lead despite never trailing by more than five and ultimately losing 25-20.BYU had only five more kills than Syracuse, but overall played a much cleaner game. Syracuse made double the amount of errors (24-12) and also finished with a much lower hitting percentage at .151 versus BYU at .303.BYU’s Roni Jones-Perry recorded a game-high 16 kills, followed closely by teammate McKenna Miller who finished with 15. Syracuse was once again led by freshman Polina Shemanova with 14 kills while sophomore Ella Saada finished with 13.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse remains in Milwaukee all weekend, next playing #10 USC at 3 p.m. on Saturday before facing off with #25 Marquette Sunday at 1 p.m. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on September 7, 2018 at 9:10 pm Contact Eric: estorms@syr.edulast_img read more

PROGRESS PAUSED: In year 5, Dino Babers must prove SU’s progress hasn’t stalled

first_img Comments Dino Babers is known for his passionate speeches. His countless movie references, his lightning fast offense and his devout belief in his faith. When he was hired to coach Syracuse in 2015, his track record of success generated enthusiasm for a flailing program.Regardless of what happens in the 2020 season, Babers has already made his imprint at Syracuse. He provided the best Orange season in more than 15 years in 2018, reenergizing the SU community about a football team that’s often seen as an afterthought to the basketball program.Babers is the first coach to last five years at SU since Paul Pasqualoni in 2004. But through four years, 2018’s 10-win season has emerged as the exception, not the norm. To use one of Babers’ favorite measuring sticks, he’s been occasionally great but not consistently good. He needs to prove 2019’s failure wasn’t a sign that the Orange have peaked under him.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLast year, for the first time in his head coaching career, Babers’ program didn’t at least match the win total from the previous season. Replacing quarterback Eric Dungey and most of the offensive line could explain a step back. But 2019 wasn’t a step back. It was a never-ending backpedal consisting of stuffed runs, sacks and long touchdowns allowed.“I would say I’m not as bad as 4-8, and probably not as good as 10-3,” Babers said. “I’m probably somewhere in between.”The underlying numbers suggest that Babers wasn’t wrong. Syracuse wasn’t as bad as 4-8 indicated his first two seasons, as injuries to Dungey led to consecutive winless Novembers. With an opportunistic defense and an efficient offense, SU won 10 games, despite a second-order wins metric of 8.5 that suggests they overperformed. Second order wins combines a myriad of statistics and suggests how many games a team should’ve won given those numbers.,Replacing both his offensive and defensive coordinators in a truncated offseason, in which players are opting-out and practices have been dramatically restructured, makes it difficult to fairly assess the Orange when they take the field at No. 18 North Carolina on Sept. 12. Babers deserves patience from the fanbase. Maybe even a few games of patience.“Last year, we let that 10-3 season get to our head,” senior Chris Elmore said. “Obviously we didn’t have a good season like we wanted to last year. So I feel like a lot more guys are humble this year.”,Babers has admitted that the SU team in the season-opener may be vastly different from the team later in the season. Positions haven’t been solidified yet, schemes are still being implemented and Babers hinted at multiple injuries impacting the team’s starting lineup.Syracuse is the third Division I team Babers has coached. There was clear progress at the first two. He took over at Eastern Illinois in 2012 after the Panthers finished 2-9 in 2011. Babers improved them by five wins each season, finishing 7-5 in 2012 and 12-2 in 2013.He then took a step forward, joining Bowling Green in the Mid-American Conference, his first head gig at an FBS school. In two years at Bowling Green, he had two winning seasons — culminating in a 10-4 season and a MAC Championship.The Orange made positive strides in Babers’ first two seasons, even if they weren’t reflected in the win column. Wins against Virginia Tech in 2016 and a historic upset of defending national champions Clemson in 2017 laid down a marker. Babers no longer needed to ask for “belief without evidence.” He’d proven that he could bring Syracuse into the national landscape again, even if only for one night.,It wasn’t only one night, though. Syracuse was a penalty away from beating Clemson again in 2018, who eventually won the National Championship. SU rolled to a 6-2 Atlantic Coast Conference record, 10 wins, a bowl victory and a preseason national ranking in 2019, the first in more than 20 years.Babers’ success gained him attention on the national stage, where some of the nations’ largest programs, including Florida State and USC, were rumored to be interested in the Orange’s head coach. He’s since signed an extension with SU and has received consistent praise from Syracuse Athletics.“I’m proud to work with Dino,” Director of Athletics John Wildhack said. “I’m thankful he’s the leader of our football program. I love having him as our coach, I love him more as a person and a friend.”The unbridled optimism entering 2019 led to plenty of excessive hype among the players, the city and the local media. Syracuse Mayor Ben Walsh hosted a preseason celebration for the Orange at City Hall. Many believed the Orange Bowl was a realistic goal. But by the second week, that was out of reach.The Daily Orange’s beat writers picked the Orange to go 9-3, 9-3 and 10-2. College GameDay was poised to come to Syracuse when defending national champions Clemson returned to the Carrier Dome to face ranked SU. But the week prior, the Orange lost to Maryland by 43, woefully underprepared for a Terrapins team that also failed to qualify for a bowl game.Instead of College GameDay and the most highly anticipated Syracuse home football game of the decade, SU fans were treated to a 41-6 drubbing on national television by the Tigers.“A lot of guys didn’t like how last season went, we expected to do much better,” linebacker Mikel Jones said. “I don’t think we overlooked anybody, I feel like we didn’t prepare a lot. Some games we just weren’t fully prepared.”The Orange replaced the boring, slow offense under Scott Shafer and had a faster pace than ever. Babers landed four-star quarterback Tommy DeVito to be Dungey’s successor. In a way, Babers’ success is tied to DeVito’s development. Multiple ACC coaches believe they’ve started to catch up to the pace of the SU offense after initially struggling to keep up.Babers proved in 2018 that he can take Syracuse to levels it probably shouldn’t be at. He needs to restore belief in a fanbase that’s still wondering what went wrong in the 2019 season that had so much promise.Until that happens, Syracuse’s progress has stalled. Published on September 9, 2020 at 11:55 pm,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.last_img read more