Press release: Expert partnership to explore and establish Human Challenge studies of COVID-19 in the UK

first_img This investment will accelerate the development of potentially life-saving vaccines to help get them to the public more quickly. Experts from the NHS, academia and the private sector are today (20 October) joining forces with the government to explore and establish human challenge trials in the UK to speed up the development of a COVID-19 vaccine.In human challenge studies, a vaccine candidate that has proven to be safe in initial trials is given to a small number of carefully selected healthy adult volunteers who are then exposed to the virus in a safe and controlled environment. Medics and scientists then closely monitor the effect on volunteers 24 hours per day to see exactly how the vaccine works and to identify any side effects.As with all clinical studies in the UK, the proposed research will be carefully considered by regulators including the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the NHS Health Research Authority through research ethics committees before any research starts.Using controlled doses of virus, the aim of the research team  will initially be to discover the smallest amount of virus it takes to cause COVID-19 infection in small groups of healthy young people, aged between 18 and 30, who are at the lowest risk of harm. Up to 90 volunteers, who are compensated for the time they spend in the study, could be involved at this stage.Human challenge studies offer the chance to accelerate development of promising vaccines against COVID-19, bringing them to people more quickly – potentially saving thousands of lives.The studies are conducted under strict conditions – these include a controlled entrance to the facility, careful decontamination of waste and a dedicated laboratory for carrying out tests, all of which help to ensure the study is delivered safely and securely. All the air leaving the unit is also cleaned so there is no risk to anyone outside the unit.Over many decades, human challenge studies have been performed safely and have played important roles in accelerating the development of treatments for diseases including malaria, typhoid, cholera, norovirus and flu. The trials have also helped researchers establish which possible vaccine is most likely to succeed in phase 3 clinical trials that would follow, usually involving thousands of volunteers.If approved by regulators and the ethics committee, the studies would start in January with results expected by May 2021.Business Secretary Alok Sharma said: We are proud to be part of this hugely important partnership which we hope will advance the world’s understanding of COVID-19 as we look to rapidly develop life-saving treatments. The Royal Free Hospital has a great history and tradition of treating and researching infectious diseases and our centre is renowned across the world for its work in this specialist area. We are looking forward to working alongside Imperial College London, BEIS, and hVIVO on such a vital piece of work over the coming months. Head of Vaccine Research Projects at PHE Porton Down, Bassam Hallis said: This research will improve understanding of the virus, the biology of the disease, the signs that a person is protected from infection or developing the disease, the vaccine candidates, and will help in making decisions about research, that it is carried out safely and based on up-to-date evidence. There is much we can learn in terms of immunity, the length of vaccine protection, and reinfection. Deputy Chief Medical Officer Professor Jonathan Van-Tam said: Dr Chris Chiu, from the Department of Infectious Disease at Imperial College London and lead researcher on the human challenge study, said: Human challenge studies can increase our understanding of COVID-19 in unique ways and accelerate development of the many potential new COVID-19 treatments and vaccines. Our number one priority is the safety of the volunteers. My team has been safely running human challenge studies with other respiratory viruses for over 10 years. No study is completely risk free, but the Human Challenge Programme partners will be working hard to ensure we make the risks as low as we possibly can. The UK’s experience and expertise in human challenge trials as well as in wider coronavirus science will help us tackle the pandemic, benefiting people in the UK and worldwide. This investment into new facilities at PHE Porton Down will enable its dedicated and expert scientists to accelerate the pace and scale of specialised testing to support the critical work of the Vaccine Taskforce. New research will explore the potential for new studies to accelerate development of a COVID-19 (coronavirus) vaccine £33.6 million government investment will back the studies in partnership with Imperial College London, hVIVO and the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust a further £19.7 million will scale up capabilities to process blood samples from clinical trials Executive Chairman of Open Orphan, hVIVO’s parent company, Cathal Friel said:center_img Implementing Human Challenge studiesWhen strict conditions are met, there is global agreement through the WHO that human challenge studies can bring important wider societal benefits which should be considered by research ethics committees.  The first stage of this project will be delivered by a partnership between Imperial College London, the Royal Free Hospital’s specialist and secure research unit in London and industry-leading clinical company hVIVO, which has pioneered viral human challenge models.The aim will be to discover the smallest amount of virus it takes to cause a person to develop COVID-19 infection. This is known as a virus characterisation study and will be backed by £33.6 million of government investment.The study will take place in world-class clinical facilities at the Royal Free specifically designed to contain the virus. Highly trained medics and scientists will be on hand to carefully examine how the virus behaves in the body and to ensure volunteer safety. Volunteers will be monitored for up to a year after participating in the study to ensure their long-term well-being.Once this first phase is completed, researchers will deploy this human challenge model which will provide an unrivalled opportunity to study closely how vaccines work in the body to stop COVID-19.Although other countries are considering human challenge studies for COVID-19, the UK is a leading country in the science behind and the delivery of these studies and will be the first to seek to establish them, with the necessary infrastructure and skilled workforce already in place.  It comes as the government is also investing £19.7 million in Public Health England (PHE) to scale up its capabilities in testing blood samples from clinical trials. The investment will fund vital equipment and a new, state-of-the-art laboratory facility at PHE Porton Down – this will accelerate essential testing to measure the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines currently in development. These tests are an essential component in supporting the development and regulatory approval of vaccine candidates. PHE’s partner, Nexelis, will be providing scientific expertise and also conducting additional testing for the evaluation of COVID-19 vaccines.The new investment will enable PHE Porton Down scientists to increase testing capacity, including evaluating individuals’ immune responses as part of the Human Challenge project.Innovation Minister Lord Bethell said: procuring the rights to a diverse range of promising vaccine candidates to spread risk and optimise chances for success providing funding for clinical studies, diagnostic monitoring and regulatory support to rapidly evaluate vaccines for safety and efficacy providing funding and support for manufacturing scale-up and fill and finish at risk so that the UK has vaccines produced at scale and ready for administration should any of these prove successful Chair of the government’s Vaccine Taskforce Kate Bingham said: A safe, fully approved, and meticulously controlled human challenge model for COVID-19 that is conducted by experienced experts may help in the search for safe and effective vaccines. First, for the many vaccines still in the mid-stages of development, human challenge studies may help pick out the most promising ones to take forward into larger Phase III trials. Second, for vaccines which are in the late stages of development and already proven to be safe and effective through Phase III studies, human challenge studies could help us further understand if the vaccines prevent transmission as well as preventing illness. At Open Orphan we are pleased to be working on behalf of the UK government and in partnership with 2 great institutions, Imperial College London and The Royal Free Hospital. Our subsidiary hVIVO is the world leader in the testing of vaccines and antivirals using human challenge studies and our contract with the UK government to develop a COVID-19 human challenge study model will safely accelerate the discovery of effective vaccines and antivirals against COVID-19. We hope our work will not just be valuable for the Company but will also help to reduce the impact of COVID-19 on the population. Our thoughts go out to all those that have been affected by the global COVID-19 pandemic. Chief Executive of the Royal Free London group Caroline Clarke said: About Public Health EnglandPHE exists to protect and improve the nation’s health and wellbeing and reduce health inequalities. It does this through world-leading science, research, knowledge and intelligence, advocacy, partnerships and the delivery of specialist public health services. PHE is an operationally autonomous executive agency of the Department of Health. It provides government, local government, the NHS, Parliament, industry and the public with evidence-based professional, scientific and delivery expertise and support. For more information on PHE visit www.gov.uk/phe or follow on Twitter. We are doing everything we can to fight coronavirus, including backing our best and brightest scientists and researchers in their hunt for a safe and effective vaccine. The funding announced today for these ground-breaking but carefully controlled studies marks an important next step in building on our understanding of the virus and accelerating the development of our most promising vaccines which will ultimately help in beginning our return to normal life. Notes to editorsHuman challenge studies have been performed safely over several decades in thousands of consenting volunteers in other disease areas such as typhoid, cholera, and influenza. They differ from standard clinical trials in which volunteers are vaccinated to see if they develop a disease circulating in the community over several months. In human challenge studies, a smaller group of volunteers is exposed to an infection after they have been vaccinated.About the government’s Vaccine TaskforceThe government’s Vaccine Taskforce (VTF) was set up under the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) in May 2020, to ensure that the UK population has access to clinically effective and safe vaccines as soon as possible, while working with partners to support international access to successful vaccines.  This is to place the UK at the forefront of global vaccine research, development, manufacture and distribution.The Vaccine Taskforce comprises a dedicated team of private sector industry professionals and officials from across government who are working at speed to build a portfolio of promising vaccine candidates that can end the global pandemic. It is chaired by biotech and life sciences expert Kate Bingham, who was appointed by the Prime Minister Boris Johnson.The Vaccine Taskforce’s approach to securing access to vaccines is through:last_img read more

McVitie’s promotes mental health initiative

first_imgMcVitie’s has joined forces with charity initiative Time to Change to promote conversations around mental health on Time to Talk Day (7 February 2019).The brand is supporting the event by donating 12,000 £1-off vouchers to be redeemed against its products at all grocery and convenience retailers nationwide from 7 February 2019.The vouchers will be included in Time to Change’s ‘Chatter Boxes’ – physical boxes filled with resources, tips and tricks designed to facilitate conversation around mental health, and distributed to thousands of workplaces and community groups around the UK.“The McVitie’s brand purpose is about enabling everyday moments of real human connection. That’s why getting behind Time to Talk Day, which promotes open and honest conversations about mental health, was so important to us. What better way to get people talking over a cup of tea and the nation’s favourite biscuit,” said Emma Stowers, brand director for McVitie’s at Pladis UK&I.Jo Loughran, director of Time to Change added: “We are delighted McVitie’s is contributing to our Time to Talk Chatter Box initiative, helping us provide the right tools for people to open up to mental health problems, talk and to listen.“We believe biscuits are one of the perfect ingredients to help break the ice and potentially start difficult conversations, so this tie-up truly feels like the perfect fit.”In 2017, McVitie’s owner Pladis signed the Time to Change Employer Pledge and, last year, committed to training all its line managers in the UK on mental health by the end of 2019.last_img read more

Renewables now more economic than coal in China, analysts say

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:China’s green light to build more coal-fired power plants probably won’t usher in a flurry of new construction as most policies and investments in the top energy user will tilt toward renewable sources.More than 10 regions will be freed of their overcapacity tag in 2022, clearing a hurdle for them to resume building coal-fired plants. But many of the nation’s largest power companies are under a state drive to develop more clean energy projects, according to Morningstar Inc., which expects growth in coal-fired capacity to lag other sources.“The profitability of coal-fired power plants is so low, there’s no incentive for them to build more,” said Morningstar analyst Jennifer Song. “China as a whole has set consumption targets for renewable energy sources. We can see those large power groups also have quotas to build more renewable projects.”Businesses and governments are tracking China’s efforts to transform its energy mix as its massive scale could shape global trends and spur a faster transition toward renewable energy. In its battle against pollution, China has spent more on renewable energy than any other country and led a campaign to burn gas instead of coal. Yet it’s still pumping money at home and abroad into coal-fired generation, and it’s forecast by the International Energy Agency to continue to consume about half the world’s coal through 2023.Data on Monday showed China’s investment during January-March in thermal power plants, which mostly consist of coal-fired generators, slumped 30 percent from a year earlier. In contrast, spending on hydropower and wind power projects rose 48 percent and 30 percent, respectively.“Most of the capital expenditure planned by coal-fired power companies will be in renewable energy,” said Song Qiuyi, a Shanghai-based analyst at Capital Securities Corp., adding the latest assessment from NEA won’t change the situation.More: New coal plants are just too expensive in China, analysis says Renewables now more economic than coal in China, analysts saylast_img read more

Red or Dead leaves W8

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Teesland plans giant Glasgow office tower

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Governor Wolf, Senate Leaders Announce Slate of Judicial Nominations

first_img June 13, 2016 Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf, Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman and Senate Democratic Leader Jay Costa announced a slate of nominations for judicial vacancies. These nominations require confirmation by the Senate.“I thank Republican and Democratic leaders in the Senate for working with me in a collaborative way to ensure these vacancies on our courts are filled,” Governor Wolf said.The nominees are:Supreme Court – Judge Sallie MundySuperior Court – Carl Solano, Judge Lillian Harris Ransom and Geoffrey MoultonCommonwealth Court – Joe Cosgrove and Julia HearthwayAllegheny County Court of Common Pleas – David SpurgeonBerks County Court of Common Pleas – Jill Gehman KoestelBucks County Court of Common Pleas – Jeffrey G. TraugerDauphin County Court of Common Pleas – Lori SerratelliLackawanna County Court of Common Pleas – Julia MunleyLehigh County Court of Common Pleas – Daniel McCarthyMontgomery County Court of Common Pleas – Joseph WalshCity of Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas: Stella Tsai, Vincent Furlong, Daniel Sulman, Lucretia Clemons, Roger Gordon and Vincent MelchiorreWashington County Court of Common Pleas: Damon FaldowskiYork County Court of Common Pleas – Kathleen Prendergast and Christy FawcettAllegheny County Magisterial District Court – Dan ButlerCentre County Magisterial District Court – Robert BascomChester County Magisterial District Court – Elizabeth Curtis SwainCumberland County Magisterial District Court – Jonathan BirbeckDauphin County Magisterial District Court – David O’LearyLackawanna County Magisterial District Court – Bruce ZeroNorthampton County Magisterial District Court – Alicia ZitoWestmoreland County Magisterial District Court – Wayne Gongaware SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Governor Wolf, Senate Leaders Announce Slate of Judicial Nominationslast_img read more

This property has not one, but two, swimming pools

first_img1664 Riverdale Drive, Hope Island is on the market, set to go to auction on February 24.It’s an entertainer’s dream — a media room, wide riverfront views and not one, but two, swimming pools.From the stunning entry pavilion of flagstone tiles meandering through palm trees, pebbles and water gardens, finished by the crisp white and timber facade, the residence opens up into a spacious and opulent interior. The Hope Island home is located in an exclusive estate.The master suite has a fully fitted out walk-in robe, large full ensuite bathroom and spectacular waterfront views while the other four bedroom suites offer similar features.The four-bedroom, five-bathroom property is located in an exclusive gated estate and offers bridge-free access to the Broadwater. The stunning entry pavilion. It offers water views and bridge-free access to the Broadwater.CoreLogic property data shows the median house price in Hope Island has surged, increasing by 43.4 per cent over the past five years. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa20 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoThe pool in a private courtyard at the side of the property.One pool is tucked away in a private sun-drenched courtyard at the side of the property, with space for a dining setting, while the other overlooks the 23.8m of water frontage and large pontoon, flanked by a timber deck and manicured gardens.Double height ceilings, large porcelain tiles and wall-length glass feature throughout to allow light to flow through.last_img read more

Brisbane Queenslander undergoes incredible transformation

first_imgThe home at 84 Watson St, Camp Hill today. Picture: supplied.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:36Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:36 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhat do QLD buyers want?00:36The owners of this 1909 Queenslander waited a decade to get their hands on the property known as Croyde.Karen Hartley said she and her husband first spotted the home at 84 Watson St, Camp Hill while walking with their two young children in 2005.“We said wouldn’t it be a great place for entertaining friends and family for the kids to grow up in,” she said.The property was placed on the market and over the ensuing 10 years the couple placed several offers on the home until one was finally accepted in 2015.“When we bought it, it was a single storey house on stilts,” Mrs Hartley said.“It was in OK condition for its age but was in need of a lot of love and care.“There was only one bathroom in the house, a small kitchen, two proper bedrooms and the dining room had been converted into another bedroom.”The original home at 84 Watson St, Camp Hill, in the 1940s. Picture: supplied.The original house was built by watchmaker and jeweller Ebenezer Jones in 1909 on an 1882sq m plot of land he purchased in 1908.He mortgaged the land for 320 pounds and built a house with VJ walls and ceilings, pressed metal cornices, brick chimney, chandeliers and hoop pine floorboards, all of which remain today. Mr Jones’ glass storefront plaque also remains with the house.The home passed through two more families before landing with the Hartleys, who undertook significant restoration work and renovations, working with the Brisbane City Architecture and Heritage Team and award-winning builder Corella Construction.The home at 84 Watson St, Camp Hill, in 2014.The heritage listed house was raised, built-in underneath and completely restored.“The amount of time, energy and passion that went into this renovation, not only from our family but also our builders and trades, is evident in the finished product,” Mrs Hartley said.“It is a true home, it’s not just a house.”Today in the original upstairs space there is a front veranda, formal lounge and dining rooms and a galley-style kitchen opening to a rear deck, along with a bathroom, sitting room, master suite with dressing room and ensuite, and second bedroom.A standout feature is the functional two-storey, double sided chimney with fireplace in the formal living room, a hearth for the cooker in the original kitchen and brick support column on the lower level.The formal living room in 2014. Picture: supplied.The timber floorboards are exposed in the living room today. Picture: supplied.Mrs Hartley said lower level of the chimney once had a fire pit with a copper pot sitting above for boiling laundry.“We still have that copper pot — it’s been full restored,” she said.And that is just the start of the restoration work done over a period of seven months, which followed eight months of planning.“Upstairs the pressed metal cornices were restored, all the decking needed to be replaced and the original glass and crystal chandeliers all had to be restored,” Mrs Hartley said.“A lot of paint had to come off, layers and layers of it.“The breeze windows had all been painted closed so a lot of work went into them. My husband restored the original mechanisms that open and close the windows.“The old gas light fittings have also been restored and they are still on the walls.”The 1960s-era kitchen and bathroom were replaced with more traditional spaces but the original claw foot bathtub still takes pride of place in the bathroom.The kitchen in 2014 only had one small window. Picture: supplied.The kitchen now has bi-fold doors opening to a deck. Picture: supplied.“The kitchen is the hub of the home,” Mrs Hartley said.“It’s a beautiful space opening to the deck. It has a 3m long Caesarstone bench with seating all the way around that takes in the city from the lights of the Gabba to the second arch of the Story Bridge.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours ago“It’s the place we find ourselves most often.”Mrs Hartley said early on in the restoration process they discovered a storage area with terrazzo flooring on the back veranda was once a bathroom, so they got permission to convert the space into an ensuite for the master bedroom.The new area downstairs houses a wine cellar, second kitchen, games lounge, bathroom, laundry and three covered patios. There are also three more bedrooms, with ensuites, walk-in wardrobes and study nooks to two.The bathroom in 2014. Picture: suppliedThe bathroom today. Picture: supplied.“Downstairs is clearly a new addition but it is in keeping with the grandeur of the house,” Mrs Hartley said.The property also has a saltwater swimming pool with pavilion, manicured gardens, fire pit and a six-car garage.“We created all the landscaping. When we bought the house (the yard) was an overgrown mess of shrubs and vines,” Mrs Hartley said.But after restoring the heritage Queenslander and creating a beautiful family home, Mrs Hartley and her husband have decided to sell the now 2025sq m property.“We thought it was going to be our forever home but we’ve found another one,” she said.The property is being marketed by Joanna Gianniotis of Place Bulimba will be auctioned on Thursday, November 7.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:42Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:42 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenTop 5 hot Brisbane suburbs 01:43Renovation FactsBudget: $1.5 millionTime: 15 monthsThe home comes with a pool, a pavilion and a six-car garage, all on a 2025sq m block. Picture: supplied.last_img read more

3 drug suspects fall in buy-bust

first_imgBACOLOD City – Police arrested three drugsuspects in a buy-bust operation in Barangay 4, Kabankalan City, NegrosOccidental. Eight sachets of suspected shabu valued ataround P35,000 were seized from 41-year-old Marvin Diancin, 26-year-old RomrexTorrecampo and 28-year-old Adolfo Bico, a police report showed. Aside from suspected shabu, four cellphonesand drug paraphernalia were also recovered from them, police said. Diancin, Torrecampo and Bico were apprehendedfollowing an entrapment operation around 2:10 a.m. on Tuesday, the reportadded.   The suspects were detained in the lockup cellof the Kabankalan City police station, facing charges for violation of RepublicAct 9165, or the Comprehensive Dangerous Drugs Act of 2002./PNlast_img read more

Unerring Madigan sinks Bath

first_img French referee Jerome Garces expertly played advantage, though, and Ford conjured a try out of nothing, leaving Leinster’s defence leaden-footed as he sliced through an inviting gap. His conversion attempt hit the post, yet Leinster responded rapidly as Madigan booted a second penalty before Bath had Watson sin-binned when he took out opposite number Kearney in mid-air, leaving Garces with little option but to brandish a yellow card. Bath had to tighten up their discipline and Madigan did not require a second invitation to keep punishing them as he completed his penalty hat-trick. Bath, though, did not learn their lesson, and two more Madigan penalties opened up a 15-5 interval advantage that meant the visitors had a mountain to climb. Leinster suffered an injury blow within a minute of the second period getting under way as wing Fergus McFadden was helped from the pitch after his head made contact with Eastmond’s shoulder. South African Zane Kirchner replaced him. Bath’s best attacking moments were provided by Ford, and he came up trumps again after 48 minutes as another break took him close to Leinster’s line before he found Hooper in support to claim a well-worked try. Ford’s successful conversion brought Bath back to just three points adrift, but Madigan’s sixth successful penalty gave Leinster a hint of breathing space. Watson then launched another thrilling break from deep inside his own 22, only for wing Horacio Agulla to drop Ford’s pass when the Leinster defence was stretched to breaking point. Bath refused to go quietly, but in Leinster they faced a team that were masters of closing out tight European games – as their record in the competition showed – and the home side looked to reassert some control. A Ford penalty six minutes from time gave Bath renewed hope, yet Leinster held out and left their opponents reflecting on what might have been. Leinster centre Madigan’s six successful penalties condemned Bath to an 18-15 defeat, although the visitors claimed touchdowns by England fly-half George Ford and captain Stuart Hooper. Ford, back at the Aviva Stadium just five weeks after being part of an England team beaten during Ireland’s march to the RBS 6 Nations title, scored a brilliant solo try and also made a break that ended with Hooper breaching Leinster’s defence. Press Association But Bath gave Madigan too many chances to punish them and he delivered a 100 per cent success-rate to book Leinster a semi-final appointment with either Toulon or Wasps, who meet on the Mediterranean coast on Sunday. Bath pushed Leinster to the limit – Ford also converted his own try and kicked a late penalty – yet they were ultimately edged out on an afternoon when Madigan’s accuracy made the difference. The visitors threw everything at their hosts as the clock ticked down, but it was not to be, with Leinster doing just enough to remain in pursuit of silverware. Bath, bidding to reach a first top-flight European semi-final for nine years, were buoyed by returning England quartet Ford, Anthony Watson, Jonathan Joseph and Dave Attwood, with fit-again Wales prop Paul James also starting, but rugby league recruit Sam Burgess was on the bench. Leinster welcomed back all of their Ireland Six Nations stars, including Jamie Heaslip, Sean O’Brien and Rob Kearney, as they looked to take another step towards a possible fourth European crown in the last seven seasons. The opening exchanges proved fast and furious but with little pattern as Leinster relied on fly-half Jimmy Gopperth’s boot, while Bath provided early counter-attacking threats via Watson and centre Kyle Eastmond. Heaslip then went close to touching down near the Bath posts, but, despite the visitors denying him, they conceded a penalty and Madigan kicked Leinster 3-0 ahead. But Bath were not to be denied and they stormed back up field through their South African flanker Francois Louw, whose powerful break meant that Leinster resorted to illegal means in an attempt to stop him. Ian Madigan booted Bath out of Europe as they made an agonising Champions Cup quarter-final exit in Dublin, despite scoring both tries of an absorbing Aviva Stadium encounter.last_img read more